What Parents Need To Know About Treating A Fever

This Post is Sponsored! Though I was compensated by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA’s) Educational Foundation in support of, all opinions are my own! Thank You For Supporting CityGirlGoneMom!

Every December, no matter how much I think I’m ahead of the game, I still feel like I’m being pulled into a hundred directions. From mastering the Christmas countdown as Santa’s number one helper, to playing catch up on all the outstanding tasks that get put on hold for one reason or another. In between it all, I try and use every spare minute to try and de-clutter by picking up around the house or clearing my inbox of countless emails that at times can feel suffocating. This is big-family mom life, Right?

Then the unexpected happens: “Mommy, I don’t feel good.”

Like hearing the sound of a scratching record, my world comes to a screeching halt the minute those words come out of my child’s mouth. Like any supermom, I put on my cape, and try to tackle the sickness the best way I know how. I lean to the experts. Just like clockwork, December not only brings the cheer of the holidays, but germs abound and most kids are likely to bring home sniffles, coughs and even fever. Today, with the help of Dr. Swanson from Seattle Mama Doc, we’re answering 4 common questions about fever every parent needs to know.

1, Is it necessary to treat every fever?
Treat your child’s symptoms – Are they acting playful even with fever – or do they seem tired and unwell? According to Dr. Swanson “Fever is a natural response of the immune system – it’s a response to illness, not illness itself.”

2. Regarding fever in kids, when should you seek out the pediatrician?
Dr. Swanson recommends seeing the pediatrician if the fever persists a) after 3 days in infants and children, b) in any fever in a baby 3 months or younger, or c) any fever over 104.

3. Are you correctly dosing your child?Be precise with right device: Before offering your child an OTC pain reliever, remember to always read the Drug Facts label first, to ensure correct dosage and to make sure you aren’t double dosing because some cold and flu OTCs contain acetaminophen. According to a study conducted by the National Institute for Health (NIH), 8 out of 10 parents have given the wrong dose of liquid medicine by accident. Only use the dosing device that comes with the medicine to ensure proper dosing. Never ever use a kitchen spoon – it is never appropriate to substitute for the dosing device that comes with the medicine. Find more tips on safe dosing, click here. And remember to dose your child based on their weight, not their age.

4. What about alternating between ibuprofen and acetaminophen?
If you decide to alternate between these two medicines, make sure you are keeping track of dosage and time. Make sure you start with one medicine and then offer the other medicine next, about 3-4 hours later. Dr. Swanson wants to remind parents that neither medicine should be used for more than 72 hours without consulting a physician. Click here for a helpful dosing chart based on child’s weight, for ibuprofen and acetaminophen.

Like all moms, from the minute we open our eyes to the moment we put our head on the pillow, we are mothering, wifing and running the machinery of the entire home. No matter what’s going on in our world, from countless dirty socks under piles and piles of laundry to running that tenth carpool of the day, our children depend on us. And having a big family, simply means having germs. As a mom to four, all I can do is take precautions and be better prepared when fever symptoms arise. Knowledge is power when it comes to life, and especially when it comes to taking care of our children. is my go to resource for being prepped during cold and flu season, and I recommend the same to all moms!

This Post is Sponsored! Though I was compensated by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA’s) Educational Foundation in support of, all opinions are my own! Thank You For Supporting CityGirlGoneMom!



  1. It’s always scary when your little one is running a fever. Thanks for the helpful info!

  2. What a great article … so informative

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